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Best day yet as Ed and John make almost 12 miles across the ice

By Ed Viesturs - April 30th, 2008

Via Satellite Phone - LISTEN IN!

Hey it's Ed Viesturs, Wednesday, April 30, we're at our third camp. I think our transmission got cut off yesterday, we were only able to ski about four hours, last few hours we were facing headwinds of 30 to 40 miles per hour, and it was getting worse and worse as we were pulling our sleds into the wind, so we decided to camp for the night. During the night the winds abated we got a couple of inches of snow and awoke this morning to a very nice day. It was cold but calm, and today over a seven and a half hour period with six hours of full on pulling we managed to go 11 and a half miles, in some of the places it was so calm it was a battle not to overheat, so we were both down to our lightest layers as we skied today. We did travel about six and a half miles down a long narrow frozen lake call Utuk, we crossed another small lake we're working our way down now and in the next couple of days we hope to cross a couple of glacier tongues , the terrain is getting quite interesting. But today was our best day so far, with six hours of pulling, what we try to do each day is go for an hour exactly, then we stop for a break for 15 minutes and then go for an hour exactly, then repeat that process six times, that is what we did today, and eventually we will try to do that seven or eight times as we get stronger and our the sleds get lighter. The sleds are getting slightly lighter as we eat some of food and use our fuel. So that is kind of part of the game as well, by the time we head back to Pond Inlet at the end of two weeks, our sleds should be reasonably light and we'll be a lot stronger as well. The way we travel, we have skis, they are kind of like backcountry touring skis, 70mm wide on the bottom of which attached synthetic climbing skins, the hairs face backward so you are able slide the ski forward but as soon as you put weight and traction on them grips the snow and even the ice. We are connected to the skis with three pin telemark binding and we wear a Norwegian version of a telemark boot that has a regular Vibram sole a three pin attachment (transmission ends, see next dispatch for conclusion).



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